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Wonton Soup

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Wonton Soup is the perfect complement to any Chinese meal. Simple chicken stock gets dressed up with a few ingredients, then paired with hearty pork and shrimp wontons.

wonton soup closeup

You’ll find Wonton Soup on the menu in most Chinese restaurants. Simple yet absolutely delicious. Pairs perfectly with just about any Chinese meal.

You can enjoy Wonton Soup as a starter but it is hearty enough to be a quick and easy meal, especially if paired with wonton noodles and some Chinese vegetables.

The soup is super easy to put together. Use store-bought chicken stock or make your own homemade Chinese Chicken Stock, then add just 6 simple ingredients.

Making your own wontons from scratch allows you to use your favorite ingredients to personalize this dish. My personal favorite combination for wontons is pork and shrimp. If you like a little bit of a crunch, you can also add finely diced water chestnuts.

How to Make Wonton Soup

We’re using a combination of ground pork and shrimp for these wontons. For the shrimp meat, simply cut the raw shrimp into small pieces. It does not have to be perfectly minced.

Prepare the wonton filling by combining 1/2 pound ground pork, 1/2 pound shrimp, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon cornstarch, 1/2 teaspoon salt, a couple of dashes of ground white pepper, and 1/4 cup of finely chopped scallions.

Mix well, then allow to marinate for 15 minutes.

wonton filling ingredients

Now it’s time to assemble the wontons. You should be able to find wonton wrappers in the frozen or refrigerated section at most grocery stores or at your local Asian supermarket.

There are many ways in which you can fold a wonton but I like preparing them in this way as they look like little money bags! 💰 And, they’re easy.

Place approximately 1 tablespoon of the pork and shrimp filling into the middle of a wonton wrapper.

Dip your finger in some water and use it to “draw” a circle around the filling on the wonton wrapper. This will help create a seal when you fold the wrapper.

making wontons for wonton soup

Gather the edges of the wonton wrapper towards the middle, then pinch just above the filling to seal it.

wrapped wonton

This recipe will make around 20 – 25 wontons.

prepared wontons

Bring a medium-sized pot of water to boil over high heat.

Cook the wontons in small batches.

raw wontons on spider skimmer

You’ll know when they’re cooked when they float to the top.

cooked wontons in boiling water

Remove the cooked wontons from the water using a spider skimmer.

cooked wontons on spider skimmer

To prevent the wontons from sticking to each other as you plate them, drizzle a bit of sesame oil over them.

drizzling sesame oil over wontons

In a separate pot, bring 6 cups of chicken stock (store-bought or homemade) to a boil over high heat.

Add 1 tablespoon soy sauce, 1 tablespoon Shaoxing wine, 2 teaspoons sesame oil, a dash of ground white pepper, 1/2 cup chopped scallions, and 2 teaspoons sugar to the chicken stock.

pouring sugar into wonton soup

Transfer the soup into individual serving bowls. Place 3 – 4 wontons into each bowl.

Garnish with more fresh chopped scallions.

Enjoy!

wonton soup overhead

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are the wontons cooked separately from the soup?

Although it may be tempting to skip the step of boiling a separate pot of water to cook the wontons, it’s important to cook the wontons separately from the soup. Each wonton wrapper is coated with cornstarch to prevent them from sticking to each other.

Even though it is a small amount, the cornstarch will transfer into the soup and affect its appearance and taste. It will also cause the soup to get a little cloudy and murky.

How do I store leftover wonton soup?

Leftover wonton soup will keep in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 4 days. It can also be kept in the freezer for up to 6 months. Keep any leftover wontons separate from the soup. If kept in the soup, the texture of the wonton skins will get too soft and mushy.

How do I reheat wonton soup?

You can reheat wonton soup by bringing it to a boil on your stovetop, or microwave for 2 – 3 minutes. Even though the wontons have to be cooked separately from the wonton soup, you can re-heat the soup and wontons at the same time in the same pot or bowl.

How do I keep leftover wontons?

Made too many wontons? Go ahead and cook them all, then keep them in the fridge for up to 4 days, or in the freezer for up to 6 months in an air-tight container or Ziploc bag.

If there are more than a couple of batches of leftover wontons, consider storing them in small batches in separate small Ziploc bags. They will inevitably stick together so by storing them in small batches separately, you can reheat just the amount that you need and not the whole lot.

Reheat by bringing them to a boil in wonton soup.

Yield: 6 - 8 servings

Wonton Soup

Wonton Soup

Wonton Soup is the perfect complement to any Chinese meal. Simple chicken stock gets dressed up with a few ingredients, then paired with hearty pork and shrimp wontons.

Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Marinate Time 15 minutes
Total Time 50 minutes

Ingredients

For the wontons

For the Soup

Instructions

    1. Prepare the wonton filling by combining ground pork, shrimp, sesame oil, cornstarch, salt, ground white pepper, and finely chopped scallions. Mix well, then allow to marinate for 15 minutes.
    2. Place approximately 1 tablespoon of the pork and shrimp filling into the middle of a wonton wrapper. Dip your finger in some water and use it to “draw” a circle around the filling on the wonton wrapper. This will help the wrapper to seal. Gather the edges of the wonton wrapper towards the middle, then pinch just above the filling to seal it. Repeat until all of the filling is used up.
    3. Bring a medium-sized pot of water to boil over high heat. Cook the wontons in small batches. You’ll know when they’re cooked when they float to the top. Remove the cooked wontons from the water using a spider skimmer.
    4. In a separate pot, bring the chicken stock to a boil over high heat.
    5. Add soy sauce, Shaoxing wine, sesame oil, ground white pepper, 1/2 cup chopped scallions and sugar.
    6. Transfer the soup into individual serving bowls. Place 3 - 4 wontons into each bowl.
    7. Garnish with the remaining fresh chopped scallions.


Notes

Tip: To prevent the wontons from sticking to each other as you plate them, drizzle a bit of sesame oil over them.

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This post contains affiliate links for your convenience. This means that if you make a purchase, I may receive a small commission at no extra cost to you. Thank you for your support!

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

6

Serving Size:

1

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 391Total Fat: 16gSaturated Fat: 5gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 10gCholesterol: 125mgSodium: 1067mgCarbohydrates: 32gFiber: 1gSugar: 5gProtein: 28g

Did you make this recipe?

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